How is SI Different?

Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a nontraditional form of tutoring that focuses on collaboration, group study, and live interaction for assisting students in one specific course the entire semester. The goal of SI Leaders is to create a collaborative learning environment through group discussions and interactive activities that reinforce concepts students learned with the professors. They break down concepts into smaller parts and emphasize cause and effect relationships.


 

  Supplemental Instruction (SI) Tutoring Study Group Study Hall Teaching Assistant (TA)
What is it? Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a nontraditional form of tutoring that focuses on collaboration, group study, and interaction for assisting students in one specific course the entire semester. Tutoring help students help themselves, or to assist or guide them to the point at which they become an independent learner, and thus no longer need a tutor. A study group is a small group of people who meet regularly to discuss and review content from a class. A study hall is a period of time set aside during the school day for students to work independently or receive academic help from a teacher or adult when they are not scheduled for an academic class. teaching assistant (TA) is an individual who assists an instructor with instructional responsibilities such as teaching, grading, and holding office hours to answer student questions.
Who is it?

SIs are model students and are working towards a college degree like you.

 

SI leaders do not know all the answers, do not teach content (new or old), and will always refer students to instructors and other resources.

Student Tutors are model students are working towards a college degree like you.

 

Professional Tutors are very proficient in content knowledge (but not experts) who have degrees.

 

Neither student nor professional tutors know all the answers, do not teach content (new or old), and will also refer students to instructors and other resources.

Study groups are made up of students taking the same classes who take the initiative to form groups, schedule regular times to meet outside of class, and review information.

 

Students work together to find resources and additional study material to reinforce concepts. They are often accountability partners for each other.

Students from a particular class or various class are placed in a common spot (cafeteria, classroom, library, etc.) to study individually.

TAs are content specialists, often with several completed college degrees who are working on becoming professors

 

TAs have demonstrated knowledge and experience in the field of study, much like a professor (but not quite!)

 

TAs are more likely to re-lecture information, lecture in place of a faculty member, and/or present new material in support of the instructor.

How does it work? SIs encourage group participation and collaborative thinking and learning. They review material students have already learned in their books, lectures, classes, labs and use collaborative learning techniques to get the students to work together to retain information.

Tutors usually work one-on-one with students to review 1-2 concepts or questions in short appointments.

They engage in a dialogue so students can get clarity on specific questions/problems/

assignments they are working on and come ready with questions for their tutor.

Study groups draw on the background, strengths, and abilities of the members to determine what and how content will be covered.

They work together to review information by reviewing and comparing notes, developing study tools, and discussing things out loud.

These are structured quiet times where students can either work independently, with another student or with a tutor. Students are usually required to study, complete homework or work on other school-related assignments. TAs often help instructors teach material during class or hold sessions outside of class to learn new content or review previously covered information in the form of lectures.
What is the relationship to the students they help? SIs are “peers” and can relate to students on their level of learning because they are also students.

Tutors are typically seen as “peers” and can relate to students on their level of learning.

Students are all classmates and are usually on the same level of knowledge/ understanding since they are taking a class together. Students are all classmates and are usually on the same level of knowledge. Tutors/Teachers that assist in Study Hall are seen as superior or as an authority. TAs are academic elites. They are seen by students as superior or as an authority.
What is the overall goal? SIs are oriented towards creating a collaborative learning environment through group discussions, interactive activities that reinforce concepts students learned with the professors. They break down concepts into smaller parts and emphasize cause and effect relationships. They generating positive energy. Tutors are oriented towards serving immediate students’ needs on particular questions. They equip students with skills so that they can answer their own questions without the help of a tutor. Study groups provide the opportunity to think out loud, share ideas, and learn from one another. Students can hear different perspectives on the subject and therefore understand it from more than position. They also instill discipline, help fill in concept gaps, and require commitments from members. The purpose of study hall is to help support students struggling with time management issues related to homework and study. Study hall provides a structured time within the academic day for students to complete homework, ask questions, and study. TAs are oriented towards meeting instructors’ expectations; they are an extension of a professor and work to help the professor manage student learning. Their goal is to lead students towards success by teaching content.
Keywords to Remeber
  • Peers
  • collaborative learning environment
  • group facilitation
  • reinforce content and break down concepts
  • Peers
  • one-on-one appointments
  • answering questions
  • reinforce content
  • Peers
  • Group study/review
  • Requires group commitment
  • Learn from one another
  • Classmates
  • Individual study/learnin
  • Structured time within an academic day
  • Content specialists
  • Academic elites
  • Seen as an authority
  • Teach content